Nature Protocols is an online journal of laboratory protocols for bench researchers. Protocols are presented in a 'recipe' style providing step-by-step descriptions of procedures which users can take to the lab and immediately apply in their own research. Protocols on the site are fully searchable and organized into logical categories to be easily accessible to researchers.

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Website
http://www.nature.com/nprot/index.html
Impact factor
7.96 (2012)

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Producing electricity at estuaries using light and osmosis

Most renewable power technologies are weather dependent. Wind farms can only operate when there's a breeze, and solar power plants rely on sunlight. Researchers at EPFL are working on a method to capture an energy source ...

Single-atom nanozymes

Nanozymes are catalytic nanomaterials with enzyme-like characteristics that have attracted enormous recent research interest. The catalytic nanomaterials offer unique advantages of low cost, high stability, tunable catalytic ...

Scientists develop protocol for chemical imaging at the nanoscale

Chemical imaging of surfaces is critical to understand the relationships between structural, chemical and functional properties in disciplines ranging across the chemical, material and biological sciences. Conventional methods ...

Measuring forces of living cells and microorganisms

Forces exerted by a living cell or a microorganism are tiny, often no larger than a few nanonewtons. For comparison, one nanonewton is the weight of one part in a billion of a typical chocolate bar. Yet, for biological cells ...

DIY crop speed breeding system to boost drought research

Plant speed breeding could be part of the solution to minimise the devastating effects of drought and climate change on crops in the future, according to a University of Queensland researcher.

Space-inspired speed breeding for crop improvement

Technology first used by NASA to grow plants extra-terrestrially is fast tracking improvements in a range of crops. Scientists at John Innes Centre and the University of Queensland have improved the technique, known as speed ...

A new guide for explorers of the submicroscopic world inside us

Researchers from the University of Virginia have established new guidelines for scientists mapping out the body molecule by molecule to help us better understand how our cells use metals such as iron and magnesium to maintain ...

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