Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine is an international, peer-reviewed journal. Each issue of Nanomedicine: NBM presents theoretical and experimental research results related to nanoscience and nanotechnology in life sciences, including Basic, Translational, and Clinical research, and commercialization of results. Article formats include Communications, Original Articles, Reviews, Perspectives, Technical and Commercialization Notes, Letters to the Editor, and Case Reports. In addition, regular features on our website will address commercialization, funding opportunities, and societal, Public Health, and ethical issues of nanomedicine. We invite authors to submit original manuscripts in these categories.

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Tiny packages may pack powerful treatment for brain tumors

Great discoveries do come in small packages. Few know that better than Ann-Marie Broome, Ph.D., who feels nanotechnology holds the future of medicine with its ability to deliver powerful drugs in tiny, designer packages.

Hepatitis virus-like particles as potential cancer treatment

UC Davis researchers have developed a way to use the empty shell of a Hepatitis E virus to carry vaccines or drugs into the body. The technique has been tested in rodents as a way to target breast cancer, and is available ...

Study reveals new method to develop more efficient drugs

A new study led by University of Kentucky researchers suggests a new approach to develop highly-potent drugs which could overcome current shortcomings of low drug efficacy and multi-drug resistance in the treatment of cancer ...

Gold-plated nano-bits find, destroy cancer cells

(Phys.org) —Comparable to nano-scale Navy Seals, Cornell scientists have merged tiny gold and iron oxide particles to work as a team, then added antibody guides to steer the team through the bloodstream toward colorectal ...

On-demand vaccines possible with engineered nanoparticles

Vaccines combat diseases and protect populations from outbreaks, but the life-saving technology leaves room for improvement. Vaccines usually are made en masse in centralized locations far removed from where they will be ...

A new imaging approach for monitoring cell metabolism

Scientists at EPFL have used a new imaging technique to monitor how glucose, our main energy source, is used in the body. Their findings may have great implications for diseases like diabetes.

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