Publisher
Nature Publishing Group on behalf of the European Molecular Biology Organization
History
2005–present
Website
http://www.nature.com/msb/index.html
Impact factor
9.667 (2010)

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How growth rates influence the fitness of bacteria

Bacteria are survival artists: When they get nutrition, they multiply rapidly, albeit they can also survive periods of hunger. But, when they grow too quickly, their ability to survive is hampered, as studies by a research ...

A developmental clock with a checkpoint function

The group of Helge Grosshans characterized the "C. elegans oscillator", over 3,700 genes that are rhythmically expressed during the larval development of C. elegans. They demonstrated the coupling of the oscillator with molting ...

How bacteria fertilize soya

Plants need nitrogen in the form of ammonium if they are to grow. In the case of a great many cultivated plants, farmers are obliged to spread this ammonium on their fields as fertiliser. Manufacturing ammonium is an energy-intensive ...

AI finds 'smell' genes might have a role beyond the nose

Humans have around 400 "smell-sensing" genes which activate in a combination of ways to allow us to smell the ranges of smells that we do. However, the genes have been found to be expressed in parts of the body other than ...

How time affects the fate of stem cells

How do temporal variations in protein concentrations affect biology? It's a question that biologists have only recently begun to address, and the findings are increasingly showing that random temporal changes in the amount ...

Machine learning sheds light on the biology of toxin exposure

Exposure to potentially harmful chemicals is a reality of life. Our ancestors, faced with naturally occurring toxins, evolved mechanisms to detoxify and expel damaging substances. In the modern world, our bodies regularly ...

Revealing the role of the mysterious small proteins

The human genome contains an estimated 20,000 genes coding for proteins. The proteins are the body's "workers," tasked with performing specific functions that are key to survival. Despite their importance, there is a type ...

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