Metrologia is an international journal dealing with the scientific aspects of metrology. It has been running since 1965 and has been published by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) since 1991. Since 2003 the journal has been published by Institute of Physics Publishing on behalf of the BIPM. Metrologia covers the fundamentals of measurements, in particular those dealing with the 7 base units of the International System of Units (meter, kilogram, second, ampere, Kelvin, candela, mole) or proposals to replace them. The editor is J. H. Williams at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, Sèvres, France. The journal had an Impact factor of 1.684 for 2010 according to Journal Citation Reports. It is indexed in ISI, Scopus, Inspec, Chemical Abstracts Service, Compendex, GeoRef, NASA Astrophysics Data System, and VINITI Abstracts Journal (Referativnyi Zhurnal).

Publisher
IOP Publishing
Country
UK
History
1965-present Metrologia
Website
http://iopscience.org/met
Impact factor
1.684 (2010)

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