The Marine Ecology Progress Series is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that covers all aspects of marine ecology. The journal was founded by Otto Kinne. Its original concept was based on Marine Ecology, also edited by Kinne and published by John Wiley & Sons. Kinne is still the editor-in-chief of the journal. The Marine Ecology Progress Series is indexed and abstracted in Biological Abstracts, Scopus, and the Science Citation Index. Official website

Publisher
Inter Research
History
1979-present
Website
http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/
Impact factor
2.483 (2010)

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Study: Great white sharks are swimming farther and deeper

The movements of great white sharks in the Pacific and Indian oceans have long been the subject of academic study, but new research is just starting to shed light on the behavior of their Atlantic Ocean counterparts.

Triggerfish needed to grow reefs, new research finds

A study of complex coral reef ecosystems in the western Indian Ocean found that one species of fish—the orange-lined triggerfish—may play a significant role in maintaining a reef's ability to thrive and grow, according ...

Boat noise stops fish finding home

(Phys.org) —Boat noise disrupts orientation behaviour in larval coral reef fish, according to new research from the Universities of Bristol, Exeter and Liège. Reef fish are normally attracted by reef sound but the study, ...

Plastic trash altering ocean habitats, study shows

A 100-fold upsurge in human-produced plastic garbage in the ocean is altering habitats in the marine environment, according to a new study led by a graduate student researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC ...

Lionfish found following the current trend

In findings published today in the Marine Ecology Progress Series, researchers have found that ocean currents may explain why the Indo-Pacific lionfish Pterois volitans living in the Atlantic is yet to make its way to Brazil.

Shark research produces the unexpected

In a surprise result, James Cook University scientists have found female blacktip reef sharks and their young stay close to shore over long time periods, with adult males only appearing during the breeding season.

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