Journal of the Royal Society Interface welcomes articles of high quality research at the interface of the physical and life sciences. It provides a high-quality forum to publish rapidly and interact across this boundary in two main ways: J. R. Soc. Interface publishes research applying chemistry, engineering, materials science, mathematics and physics to the biological and medical sciences; it also highlights discoveries in the life sciences of relevance to the physical sciences. Both sides of the interface are considered equally and it is one of the only journals to cover this exciting new territory. J. R. Soc. Interface welcomes contributions on a diverse range of topics, including but not limited to; biocomplexity, bioengineering, bioinformatics, biomaterials, biomechanics, bionanoscience, biophysics, chemical biology, computer science (as applied to the life sciences), medical physics, synthetic biology, systems biology, theoretical biology and tissue engineering.

Publisher
The Royal Society
Country
United Kingdom
History
2004-present
Website
http://rsif.royalsocietypublishing.org
Impact factor
4.260 (2010)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Is social networking making us stupid?

In a study published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface scientists have found that whilst mass connectivity through social media and the internet makes us look smarter it might be making us stupider.

How social media has synchronized human civilization

Human activity, whether commercial or social, contains patterns and moments of synchronicity. In recent years, social media like Twitter has provided an unprecedented volume of data on the daily activities of humans all over ...

Why is language unique to humans?

New research published today in Journal of the Royal Society Interface suggests that human language was made possible by the evolution of particular psychological abilities.

Carrot or stick? Game-theory can optimize collaboration

What motivates people to cooperate in collaborative endeavors? "First carrot, then stick". Tatsuya Sasaki, mathematician from the University of Vienna, has put forth for the first time ever a mathematical proof of this process. ...

Robot fish found able to lead real fish (w/ video)

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers studying schooling in fish have discovered that a real fish will follow a robot fish if it will help them use less energy swimming. This is the conclusion of a pair of engineers from New York’s ...

page 1 from 27