Journal of the Royal Society Interface welcomes articles of high quality research at the interface of the physical and life sciences. It provides a high-quality forum to publish rapidly and interact across this boundary in two main ways: J. R. Soc. Interface publishes research applying chemistry, engineering, materials science, mathematics and physics to the biological and medical sciences; it also highlights discoveries in the life sciences of relevance to the physical sciences. Both sides of the interface are considered equally and it is one of the only journals to cover this exciting new territory. J. R. Soc. Interface welcomes contributions on a diverse range of topics, including but not limited to; biocomplexity, bioengineering, bioinformatics, biomaterials, biomechanics, bionanoscience, biophysics, chemical biology, computer science (as applied to the life sciences), medical physics, synthetic biology, systems biology, theoretical biology and tissue engineering.

Publisher
The Royal Society
Country
United Kingdom
History
2004-present
Website
http://rsif.royalsocietypublishing.org
Impact factor
4.260 (2010)

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How a floating fern withstands rain

The tropical floating fern Salvinia molesta has developed sophisticated structures to allow water to roll off its leaves quickly—even during heavy rainfall. This relieves the pressure on the leaves floating on the water ...

A better estimate for tick numbers with 'citizen science' data

Apps and websites like eBird and iNaturalist encourage members of the public to report their observations on everything from songbird migration patterns to the presence of new planets. The result is massive datasets that ...

Catching the fog as it rolls in for more fresh water

In the Namib desert—one of the driest places in the world—a tiny species of beetle climbs the dunes, leans its body toward the wind, and catches the only source of water it can: passing droplets of fog.

Size matters for bee 'superorganism' colonies

Scientists have carefully studied the intricacies of how individual organisms live and act together in groups known as biological collectives. In "superorganisms" such as bee colonies, the interactions of the individual members ...

Whale migration in our noisy oceans

The long-distance migrations performed by groups of animals offer some of the most spectacular natural phenomena on our planet.

Antlions use sand-throwing to help capture prey

A team of researchers from Kiel and Aarhus universities has found that there is more to the sand-throwing done by antlions than previously thought. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group ...

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