Journal of the Royal Society Interface welcomes articles of high quality research at the interface of the physical and life sciences. It provides a high-quality forum to publish rapidly and interact across this boundary in two main ways: J. R. Soc. Interface publishes research applying chemistry, engineering, materials science, mathematics and physics to the biological and medical sciences; it also highlights discoveries in the life sciences of relevance to the physical sciences. Both sides of the interface are considered equally and it is one of the only journals to cover this exciting new territory. J. R. Soc. Interface welcomes contributions on a diverse range of topics, including but not limited to; biocomplexity, bioengineering, bioinformatics, biomaterials, biomechanics, bionanoscience, biophysics, chemical biology, computer science (as applied to the life sciences), medical physics, synthetic biology, systems biology, theoretical biology and tissue engineering.

Publisher
The Royal Society
Country
United Kingdom
History
2004-present
Website
http://rsif.royalsocietypublishing.org
Impact factor
4.260 (2010)

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Butterflies create jet propulsion with a clap of their wings

The whimsical, wafting flight of butterflies may not give the impression of top aerodynamic performance, but research published on Wednesday suggests their large flexible wings could be perfectly designed to give them a burst ...

Can social networks help us be more creative?

The algorithms that social media platforms use to recommend who we should "follow" are designed to steer us to people who likely share the same ideas and interests.

Oysters produce 3-D structures organised by physical processes

Scientists from the University of Granada (UGR) have discovered that oysters are capable of producing three-dimensional structures organized by physical (colloidal) processes—the result of which resembles a solid foam—by ...

Like fire and ice: Why societies are increasingly fragmenting

Scientists at the Complexity Science Hub Vienna (CSH) have shown that the accelerating fragmentation of society—often referred to as filter bubbles—is a direct consequence of the growing number of social contacts. According ...

Inside the secret lives of synchronous fireflies

During typical summers in the southeastern U.S., streams of visitors travel to Great Smoky Mountains National Park to witness one of nature's most spectacular displays of light: thousands of male fireflies, all flashing together ...

Sustainable chemistry at the quantum level

Developing catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production requires a kind of Goldilocks Effect—some catalysts are too ineffective while others are too uneconomical. Catalyst testing also takes a lot of time and ...

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