Journal of the Geological Society (JGS) aims to publish the most topical and highest quality papers, summarizing the results of recent research across the full range of the Earth Sciences. Papers are frequently interdisciplinary in nature, often refer to regional studies and should emphasize the development of understanding of fundamental geological processes. The implications of regional studies should extend beyond their geographical context. Alternatively more specialized papers can be submitted, but they should be written in a style that is easily understood by non-specialists to illustrate the progress being made in that specific area of the Earth Sciences. Reviews on topics of current interest are also welcome, but they too should be written to cater for non-specialist readers. Specials are short papers on topical or controversial issues in Earth Sciences and receive fast-track reviewing procedures, allowing publication in less than 6 months.

Publisher
Geological Society of London
Country
United Kingdom
History
1971 - present
Website
http://jgs.geoscienceworld.org/

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Site of biggest ever meteorite collision in the UK discovered

Evidence for the ancient, 1.2 billion years old, meteorite strike, was first discovered in 2008 near Ullapool, NW Scotland by scientists from Oxford and Aberdeen Universities. The thickness and extent of the debris deposit ...

Research sheds new light on 'world's oldest animal fossils'

A team of researchers, led by the University of Bristol, has uncovered that ancient fossils, thought to be some of the world's earliest examples of animal remains, could in fact belong to other groups such as algae.

Tracking records of the oldest life forms on Earth

The discovery provides a new characteristic 'biosignature' to track the remains of ancient life preserved in rocks which are significantly altered over billions of years and could help identify life elsewhere in the Solar ...

Ash fall preserved 'nursery' of earliest animals

(Phys.org) -- A volcanic eruption around 579 million years ago buried a 'nursery' of the earliest-known animals under a Pompeii-like deluge of ash, preserving them as fossils in rocks in Newfoundland, new research suggests.

Ancient life in three dimensions

Hidden secrets about life in Somerset 190 million years ago have been revealed by researchers at the University of Bristol and the Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution (BRLSI) in a new study of some remarkable fossils. ...

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