The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) is a weekly, peer-reviewed, medical journal, published by the American Medical Association. Beginning in July 2011, the editor in chief will be Howard C. Bauchner, vice chairman of pediatrics at Boston University’s School of Medicine, replacing Catherine D. DeAngelis, who has served since 2000. In 1883, the first editor was Nathan Smith Davis (1817–1904). From 1883–1960, this journal was listed with ISSN 0002-9955 and without the acronym JAMA. Furthermore, there are French and Spanish language editions of JAMA. Established in 1883 by the American Medical Association and published continuously since then, JAMA publishes original research, reviews, commentaries, editorials, essays, medical news, correspondence, and ancillary content (such as abstracts of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report). The journal covers a variety of medical topics. It includes fundamental research, research for the clinical sciences, and informs physicians of developments in other fields. Issues pertaining to medicine and health care are debated in this journal. Broader topical coverage related to medicine, includes nonclinical aspects of medicine,

Publisher
American Medical Association
Country
United States
History
1883–present
Website
http://jama.ama-assn.org/
Impact factor
28.899 (2009)

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