The Journal of Retailing is devoted to advancing the state of knowledge and its application with respect to all aspects of retailing, its management, evolution, and current theory. The field of retailing includes both products and services, the supply chains and distribution channels that serve retailers, the relationships between retailers and members of the supply channel, and all forms of direct marketing and emerging electric markets to households. Articles may take an economic or behavior approach, but all reflect rigorous analysis and a depth of knowledge of relevant theory and existing literature. Empirical work is based upon the scientific method, modern sampling procedures and statistical analysis.

Publisher
Elsevier
Website
http://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-retailing
Impact factor
2.257 (2011)

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What do iPhones, Halloween candy, and sushi have in common?

How people seek to express their uniqueness is played out in many ways - one of the more subtle ways is how they choose products when presented with product-related information in various colors, versus in black and white ...

Squaring the circle: Merchandising embarrassing products

Buying an intimate personal care product can be embarrassing, especially if the act is observed by acquaintances or perfect strangers. From selecting the product to carrying it to a register, to placing it on the counter ...

The family-owned-franchise penalty

While a family-owned business may have marketing appeal, franchisees that are family-owned don't, on average, perform as well financially as non-family owned franchisees. That critical insight was revealed in recent research ...

Kant, Hume, and the retailer's dilemma

If you're wondering how 18th century philosophers could possibly serve to guide 21st century retailers, this paper places their opposing perspectives on ethics in the context of how merchants react to customers who violate ...

Lively tunes boost sales in crowded stores

If a store is crowded, people tend to buy more if the sound system is playing a fast-paced song rather than a ballad. That's what a team of researchers found in a field experiment across a chain of grocery convenience stores ...

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