The Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (often referred to as JPSP) is a monthly psychology journal of the American Psychological Association. It is considered one of the top journals in the fields of social and personality psychology. Its focus is on empirical research reports; however, specialized theoretical, methodological, and review papers are also published. According to the 2008 Journal Citation Reports, its current impact factor is 5.035, which makes JPSP the #3 journal in the area of social and personality psychology, and #1 among the empirical journals in these areas. The journal is divided into three independently edited sections: Attitudes and Social Cognition, Interpersonal Relations and Group Processes, and Personality Processes and Individual Differences. These sections are (as of Jan. 2009) edited by Charles M. Judd, Jeffry A. Simpson, and Laura A. King respectively. JPSP articles typically involve a lengthy introduction and literature review, followed by several related studies that explore different aspects of a theory or test multiple competing hypotheses. Some researchers see the multiple-experiments requirement as an excessive burden that delays the

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Country
USA
Website
http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/psp/
Impact factor
5.035 (2008)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Phones are making people more, not less, social, researcher says

Smartphones are getting a bum rap. The common perception that as people become increasingly attached to their devices they are becoming less social is just wrong, according to Stanford communication scholar Gabriella Harari.

Study explores distrust of atheists by believers

Distrust is the central motivating factor behind why religious people dislike atheists, according to a new study led by University of British Columbia psychologists.

Exploring the negative consequences of stereotyping

Social mythologies, like the old saw that "white men can't jump," may in fact have some negative consequences for those being stereotyped. And even if the majority of people do not openly endorse these negative beliefs, recent ...

Study says logos make a group seem 'real'

Organizations have logos, sports teams have mascots, countries have flags and national anthems. In marketing plans and political campaigns, a good logo is considered an essential tool for building brand identity.

#MeToo surge could change society in pivotal ways, analysts say

When allegations of serial sexual misconduct by movie mogul Harvey Weinstein broke in October, they triggered an intense national reckoning over sexual harassment and assault in the workplace and beyond. In the weeks since, ...

page 1 from 5