The Journal of Lipid Research (JLR) focuses on the science of lipids in health and disease. The Journal emphasizes lipid function and the biochemical and genetic regulation of lipid metabolism. In addition, JLR publishes manuscripts on patient-oriented and epidemiological research relating to altered lipid metabolism, including modification of dietary lipids. The JLR aims to be on the forefront of the emerging areas of genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and lipidomics as they relate to lipid metabolism and function. The JLR covers biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, structural biology, genetics, genomics, immunology, metabolism, nutrition and clinical science as they relate to lipids. The following are representative areas covered in the Journal:

Publisher
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Website
http://www.jlr.org/

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The yin and yang of cell signaling

Lysophospholipids (LysoPLs) are potent cellular signaling biomolecules that also maintain the structure, shape and fluidity of cell membranes.

Lipoproteins behave 'almost like a tiny Velcro ball'

Cholesterol carried in high-density lipoprotein particles, or HDL cholesterol, has been dubbed the good cholesterol, because people whose HDL levels are high have a lower risk of developing heart disease. That link was first ...

A molecular look at nascent HDL formation

Oil and water don't mix. But our aqueous blood is full of different types of hydrophobic lipids—including cholesterol. In order to travel via the bloodstream, those lipids need to hitch a ride on an amphipathic carrier. ...

New insights into the fuctions of fat metabolism

What happens when the body's fat stores are activated? With the support of the Austrian Science Fund FWF, the biochemist Ruth Birner-GrĂĽnberger investigated the complex interaction of activation and regulation in fat breakdown, ...

Breakthrough in identification of important protein

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen are the first in the world to develop a secure way of measuring the important protein apo-M. This could prove relevant for research into diseases such as diabetes, arteriosclerosis ...

Simulation predicts epidermal responses to compounds

Skin is the body's largest organ. It is a protective barrier, keeping microbes out and moisture in. It also regulates temperature, enables sensation, and makes vitamin D. But researchers don't fully understand at the molecular ...