The Journal of Interpersonal Violence is a peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes papers in the field of criminology and focuses on the study of victims and perpetrators of interpersonal violence. The journal s editor-in-chief is Jon R. Conte (University of Washington). It was established in 1986 and is currently published by SAGE Publications. The Journal of Interpersonal Violence is abstracted and indexed in Scopus and the Social Sciences Citation Index. According to the Journal Citation Reports, its 2010 impact factor is 1.354, ranking it 13 out of 43 journals in the category "Criminology & Penology", 14 out of 39 journals in the category "Family Studies", and 31 out of 67 journals in the category "Psychology, Applied".

Publisher
SAGE Publications
History
1986-present
Website
http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal200855
Impact factor
1.354 (2010)

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