The Journal of Chemical Education is the official journal of the Division of Chemical Education of the American Chemical Society, co-published with the American Chemical Society Publications Division. Launched in 1924, the Journal of Chemical Education is the world’s premier chemical education journal. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles and related information as a resource to those in the field of chemical education and to those institutions that serve them. JCE typically addresses chemical content, activities, laboratory experiments, instructional methods, and pedagogies. The Journal serves as a means of communication among people across the world who are interested in the teaching and learning of chemistry. This includes instructors of chemistry from middle school through graduate school, professional staff that support these teaching activities, as well as some scientists in commerce, industry, and government.

Publisher
American Chemical Society
Website
http://pubs.acs.org/journal/jceda8
Impact factor
0.739 (2011)

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Engaging undergrads remotely with an escape room game

To prevent the spread of COVID-19, many universities canceled classes or held them online this spring—a change likely to continue for many this fall. As a result, hands-on chemistry labs are no longer accessible to undergraduate ...

Using Jenga to explain lithium-ion batteries

Tower block games such as Jenga can be used to explain to schoolchildren how lithium-ion batteries work, meeting an educational need to better understand a power source that has become vital to everyday life.

The candy-cola soda geyser experiment, at different altitudes

Dropping Mentos candies into a bottle of soda causes a foamy jet to erupt. Although science fair exhibitors can tell you that this geyser results from rapid degassing of the beverage induced by the candies, the precise means ...

Metacognition training boosts gen chem exam scores

It's a lesson in scholastic humility: You waltz into an exam, confident that you've got a good enough grip on the class material to swing an 80 percent or so, maybe a 90 if some of the questions go your way.

Extremely tiny, hugely versatile nanoglobules

Ludwig Maximilian University chemists have demonstrated a simple way to load nanoglobules with light-absorbing organic molecules. The method could serve as the basis for the formulation of innovative sunscreens.

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