Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
History
1974–present
Website
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0305-0270&site=1
Impact factor
4.273 (2010)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Should we say farewell to the Arctic's unique nature?

Temperatures are rising faster in the Arctic than any other place on Earth. If these changes continue, it is likely that the unique and diverse Arctic tundra will change into a more uniform vegetation dominated by shrubs.

Mapping trees can help count endangered lemurs

The vast majority of lemur species are on the edge of extinction, experts warn. But not every lemur species faces a grim future. There may be as many as 1.3 million white-fronted brown lemurs still in the wild, for example, ...

Worm-eating mice reveal how evolution works on islands

Australia has a bunch of kangaroo species, Madagascar has multiple species of lemurs, the Galapagos Islands have boulder-sized tortoises—islands get lots of cool animals. That's because when animals are isolated on islands, ...

Fossil evidence shows bats colonized from islands to continents

Plants and animals are generally thought to colonize from continents to islands, over time leading to the evolution of separate island species. Scientists have theorized that the reverse – colonizing from islands to continents ...

Tubers in trouble

Extinction by its very nature is irreversible. Once a species is extinct, it's too late for conservation practitioners to act. So, for us working on the front line of plant conservation, instead of just questioning whether ...

Shallow soils promote savannas in South America

New research suggests that the boundary between South American tropical rainforests and savannas is influenced by the depth to which plants can root. Shallow rooting depth promotes the establishment of savannas. Previous ...

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