Green Chemistry provides a unique forum for the publication of innovative research on the development of alternative sustainable technologies.  With a wide general appeal, Green Chemistry publishes urgent communications and high quality research papers as well as review articles. The scope of Green Chemistry is based on, but not limited to, the definition proposed by Anastas and Warner (Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice, P. T. Anastas and J. C. Warner, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1998): Green chemistry is the utilisation of a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in the design, manufacture and application of chemical products. 

Publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
Website
http://pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/journalissues/gc
Impact factor
6.32 (2011)

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Engineered microbe may be key to producing plastic from plants

With a few genetic tweaks, a type of soil bacteria with an appetite for hydrocarbons shows promise as a biological factory for converting a renewable—but frustratingly untapped—bounty into a replacement for ubiquitous ...

Artificial leaf as mini-factory for medicine

Using sunlight for sustainable and cheap production of, for example, medicines. The 'mini-factory' in the form of a leaf that chemical engineers from Eindhoven University of Technology presented in 2016 showed that it is ...

Nickel in the X-ray limelight

Making chemicals for industrial processes often requires scientists to use a catalyst—a substance that speeds up a chemical reaction, reducing the amount of energy it takes to make different products.

Metal-free catalyst extends the range of ester synthesis

Esters are among the most important classes of compounds in organic chemistry. Simple esters are known for their pleasant, often fruity aromas. Meanwhile, the larger, more complex examples have a wide spectrum of industrial ...

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