Global Biogeochemical Cycles features research on regional to global biogeochemical interactions, as well as more local studies that demonstrate fundamental implications for biogeochemical processing at regional or global scales. Published papers draw on a wide array of methods and knowledge and extend in time from the deep geologic past to recent historical and potential future interactions. This broad scope includes studies that elucidate human activities as interactive components of biogeochemical cycles and physical Earth Systems including climate. Authors are required to make their work accessible to a broad interdisciplinary range of scientists.

Publisher
Wiley
Website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1944-9224
Impact factor
4.682 (2012)

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Scientists build new atlas of ocean's oxygen-starved waters

Life is teeming nearly everywhere in the oceans, except in certain pockets where oxygen naturally plummets and waters become unlivable for most aerobic organisms. These desolate pools are "oxygen-deficient zones," or ODZs. ...

Widespread loss of ocean oxygen to become noticeable in 2030s

A reduction in the amount of oxygen dissolved in the oceans due to climate change is already discernible in some parts of the world and should be evident across large regions of the oceans between 2030 and 2040, according ...

Can oceans turn the tide on the climate crisis?

As we pump more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, the world is warming at an alarming rate, with devastating consequences. While our vast oceans are helping to take the heat out of climate change, new research shows that ...

Ocean food web is key in the global carbon cycle

Nothing dies of old age in the ocean. Everything gets eaten and all that remains of anything is waste. But that waste is pure gold to oceanographer David Siegel, director of the Earth Research Institute at UC Santa Barbara.

Study shows oceanic phytoplankton declines in northern hemisphere

The world's oceans have seen significant declines in certain types of microscopic plant-life at the base of the marine food chain, according to a new NASA study. The research, published Sept. 23 in Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ...

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