Publisher
BioMed Central
Country
United Kingdom
History
2004–present
Website
http://www.frontiersinzoology.com/
Impact factor
2.82 (unofficial) )

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Losing flight had huge benefits for ants, new study finds

Ants are one of the most successful groups of animals on the planet, occupying anywhere from temperate soil to tropical rainforests, desert dunes and kitchen counters. They're social insects and their team-working abilities ...

The growing pains of orphan chimpanzees

The prolonged periods of juvenility and nutritional dependence that are characteristic of human development are thought to facilitate brain and somatic growth in children, as well as provide opportunities to learn and accumulate ...

Jaw–some wombats may be great survivors

Flexible jaws may help wombats better survive in a changing world by adapting to climate change's effect on vegetation and new diets in conservation sanctuaries.

Male spiders show their sensitive side

The sensory capacity of male spiders during mating may be higher than previously thought, a study in the open access journal Frontiers in Zoology suggests.

Traffic noise may make birds age faster

Traffic noise may be associated with an increased rate of telomere loss in Zebra finches that have left the nest, according to a study published in Frontiers in Zoology. Telomeres are caps on the ends of chromosomes that ...

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