Coral Reefs, the Journal of the International Society for Reef Studies, presents multidisciplinary literature across the broad fields of reef studies, publishing analytical and theoretical papers on both modern and ancient reefs. These encourage the search for theories about reef structure and dynamics, and the use of experimentation, modeling, quantification and the applied sciences. Coverage includes such subject areas as population dynamics; community ecology of reef organisms; energy and nutrient flows; biogeochemical cycles; physiology of calcification; reef responses to natural and anthropogenic influences; stress markers in reef organisms; behavioural ecology; sedimentology; diagenesis; reef structure and morphology; evolutionary ecology of the reef biota; palaeoceanography of coral reefs and coral islands; reef management and its underlying disciplines; molecular biology and genetics of coral; aetiology of disease in reef-related organisms; reef responses to global change, and more. 

Publisher
Springer
Website
http://www.springer.com/life+sciences/ecology/journal/338
Impact factor
3.878 (2011)

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New eDNA tool research helps scientists find deep sea corals

Curtin University researchers have developed a promising new toolkit for monitoring threatened coral ecosystems by analyzing environmental DNA (eDNA) extracted from waters off the coast of the Cocos (Keeling) Islands.

Who controls whom: Algae or sea anemone?

Bleached anemones—those lacking symbiotic algae—do not move toward light, a behavior exhibited by healthy, symbiotic anemones. Published in Coral Reefs, this finding from Carnegie's Shawna Foo, Arthur Grossman, and Ken ...

Study shows how vital coral algae adapts to warming seas

Scientists at the University of Southampton have shown how a specific type of symbiotic algae, which lives in coral tissue, is able to adapt and survive the hotter seawater temperatures caused by global warming.

Back-to-back heatwaves kill more than two-thirds of coral

By comparing reefs before and after two extreme heatwaves only 12 months apart, a collaborative team of researchers including scientists from Bangor's School of Ocean Sciences found that living hard corals in the central ...

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