Chemical Science is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering the chemical sciences. It was established in July 2010 and is published monthly by the Royal Society of Chemistry. Its first impact factor will be released in 2012. The PDF files of the 2010 and 2011 content are free to access until the end of 2011. Authors can elect to have accepted articles published as open access. Chemical Science won the Best New Journal 2011 award from the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers. The editor-in-chief is David MacMillan (Princeton University). Chemical Science publishes original research articles across the chemical sciences, including organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, physical chemistry, environmental chemistry, green chemistry, theoretical chemistry, supramolecular chemistry, analytical chemistry, materials science, nanoscience, and chemical biology. Chemical Science publishes all original (primary) research in one format called "Edge Articles", which have no page limits and should be written in a succinct way. Authors can make use of electronic supplementary information to store bulky experimental details and data. The journal also publishes mini-reviews

Publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
Country
United Kingdom
History
2010-present
Website
http://www.rsc.org/chemicalscience

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Molecular tweak improves organic solar cell performance

A molecular tweak has improved organic solar cell performance, bringing us closer to cheaper, efficient, and more easily manufactured photovoltaics. The new design approach, targeting the molecular backbone of the cell's ...

Energy researchers invent error-free catalysts

A team of researchers from the University of Minnesota, University of Massachusetts Amherst, University of Delaware, and University of California Santa Barbara have invented oscillating catalyst technology that can accelerate ...

New type of indoor solar cells for smart connected devices

In a future where most things in our everyday life are connected through the internet, devices and sensors will need to run without wires or batteries. In a new article in Chemical Science, researchers from Uppsala University ...

Metals could be the link to new antibiotics

Compounds containing metals could hold the key to the next generation of antibiotics to combat the growing threat of global antibiotic resistance.

Invisible X-rays turn blue

A new reaction system can detect X-rays at the highest sensitivity ever recorded by using organic molecules. The system, developed by researchers at Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Ikoma, Japan; and Centre ...

These artificial proteins have a firm grasp on metal

A team of scientists led by Berkeley Lab has developed a library of artificial proteins or "peptoids" that effectively "chelate" or bind to lanthanides and actinides, heavy metals that make up the so-called f-block elements ...

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