Cell Stem Cell is a broad-spectrum journal that covers the entire spectrum of stem cell biology. Topics covered include embryonic stem cells, pluripotency, germline stem cells, tissue-specific stem cells, stem cell differentiation, epigenetics, stem cell genomics and systems biology, genome reprogramming, cancer stem cells, stem cell niches, stem-cell-based disease models, nuclear transfer technology, bioengineering, drug discovery, in vivo imaging of stem cells, therapeutic applications, regenerative medicine, clinical and translational insights, stem cell research policies, ethical issues, and technical or resource-based innovations. We will consider studies from any model system that provides insights into stem cell biology, and we encourage submissions on human stem cells.

Publisher
Cell Press
Country
United States
History
2007–present
Website
http://www.cell.com/cell-stem-cell/home
Impact factor
23.563 (2009)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

How cells remember inflammation

When a tissue experiences inflammation, its cells remember. Pinning proteins to its genetic material at the height of inflammation, the cells bookmark where they left off in their last tussle. Next exposure, inflammatory ...

The importance of DNA compaction in tissue formation

Scientists led by Dr. Salvador Aznar-Benitah, head of the Stem Cells and Cancer laboratory at IRB Barcelona, have described the alterations that occur during mammary gland formation when heterochromatin (the part of DNA that ...

To be or not to be: An organoid

Mini-organs, or organoids, play a big role in the future of medicine. Their countless applications can help develop and implement tailored therapies for each patient. The revolutionary development of organoids started in ...

Organoids produce embryonic heart

There was a time when the idea of growing organs in the lab was the stuff of science fiction. Today, stem cell biology and tissue engineering are turning fiction into reality with the advent of organoids: tiny lab-grown tissues ...

To make mini-organs grow faster, give them a squeeze

The closer people are physically to one another, the higher the chance for exchange, of things like ideas, information, and even infection. Now researchers at MIT and Boston Children's Hospital have found that, even in the ...

page 1 from 14