Viral proteins may regulate human embryonic development

A fertilized human egg may seem like the ultimate blank slate. But within days of fertilization, the growing mass of cells activates not only human genes but also viral DNA lingering in the human genome from ancient infections.

'Open' stem cell chromosomes reveal new possibilities for diabetes

Stem cells hold great promise for treating a number of diseases, in part because they have the unique ability to differentiate, specializing into any one of the hundreds of cell types that comprise the human body. Harnessing ...

Seven strategies to advance women in science

Despite the progress made by women in science, engineering, and medicine, a glance at most university directories or pharmaceutical executive committees tells the more complex story. Women in science can succeed, but they ...

State funding boosts stem cell research in California, other states

When federal funding regulations created limitations on human embryonic stem cell research, several states created their own funding programs. A new study analyzed stem cell funding programs in four states that provided their ...

Improving genome editing with drugs

One of the most exciting scientific advances made in recent years is CRISPR—the ability to precisely edit the genome of cells. However, although this method has incredible potential, the process is extremely inefficient. ...

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