Cell Metabolism, launched in January 2005, is one of the newer titles in the Cell Press family. The journal focuses on physiology, with an emphasis on understanding the molecular basis of how the body self-regulates in the face of change, and how disturbances in these balances can lead to disease. Advances in these fields take on a special importance given the increasing prevalence of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and related maladies ("metabolic diseases") in the developed world. Created in response to what top scientists saw as a growing need for a specialized journal in this field, Cell Metabolism is run by in-house editorial and production teams with full responsibility for selecting and preparing content for publication.

Publisher
Elsevier
Website
http://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/home

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Bone, not adrenaline, drives fight or flight response

When faced with a predator or sudden danger, the heart rate goes up, breathing becomes more rapid, and fuel in the form of glucose is pumped throughout the body to prepare an animal to fight or flee.

Why do women live longer than men?

Women live longer than men. This simple statement holds a tantalizing riddle that Steven Austad, Ph.D., and Kathleen Fischer, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham explore in a perspective piece published in Cell ...

Rehabilitating lactate: From poison to cure

George Brooks has been trying to reshape thinking about lactate—in the lab, the clinic and on the training field—for more than 40 years, and finally, it seems, people are listening. Lactate, it's becoming clear, is not ...

Performing cellular surgery with a laser-powered nanoblade

To study certain aspects of cells, researchers need the ability to take the innards out, manipulate them, and put them back. Options for this kind of work are limited, but researchers reporting May 10 in Cell Metabolism describe ...

Obesity genes probably didn't evolve to help us survive famine

Genes that helped our ancestors store fat in times of famine may have been useful, but whether they cursed future generations with a predisposition toward obesity is a little more controversial. This popular "thrifty gene ...

Getting oxygenated blood to exercising muscles

ETH Zurich Professor Katrien De Bock and her team have discovered a certain type of blood vessel cell in muscles that multiplies rapidly upon exercise, thereby forming new blood vessels. Researchers can use this to find novel ...

Vitamin B3 revitalizes energy metabolism in muscle disease

An international team of scientists, led by University of Helsinki reported that vitamin B3, niacin, has therapeutic effects in progressive muscle disease. Niacin delayed disease progression in patients with mitochondrial ...

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