Cell Metabolism, launched in January 2005, is one of the newer titles in the Cell Press family. The journal focuses on physiology, with an emphasis on understanding the molecular basis of how the body self-regulates in the face of change, and how disturbances in these balances can lead to disease. Advances in these fields take on a special importance given the increasing prevalence of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and related maladies ("metabolic diseases") in the developed world. Created in response to what top scientists saw as a growing need for a specialized journal in this field, Cell Metabolism is run by in-house editorial and production teams with full responsibility for selecting and preparing content for publication.

Publisher
Elsevier
Website
http://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/home

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Solving the mystery behind how nutrients enter cells

For the nutrients that feed our cells to reach their destination, proteins embedded in the cell membrane often must shuttle what's needed across the threshold. When this system breaks down and metabolites fail to reach their ...

The secret to a longer lifespan? Gene regulation holds a clue

Natural selection has produced mammals that age at dramatically different rates. Take, for example, naked mole rats and mice; the former can live up to 41 years, nearly ten times as long as similar-size rodents such as mice.

Researchers discover new therapeutic target for severe asthma

Scientists working in the School of Biochemistry and Immunology at the Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute (TBSI) have uncovered a new approach for treating severe asthma. They have high hopes their discovery may pave the ...

Fixing protein production errors lengthens lifespan

Reducing naturally occurring errors in protein synthesis (production) improves both health and lifespan, finds a new study in simple model organisms led by researchers at UCL and MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences.

Getting oxygenated blood to exercising muscles

ETH Zurich Professor Katrien De Bock and her team have discovered a certain type of blood vessel cell in muscles that multiplies rapidly upon exercise, thereby forming new blood vessels. Researchers can use this to find novel ...

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