Biomaterials is an international journal covering the science and clinical application of biomaterials. A biomaterial is now defined as a substance that has been engineered to take a form which, alone or as part of a complex system, is used to direct, by control of interactions with components of living systems, the course of any therapeutic or diagnostic procedure. It is the aim of the journal to provide a peer-reviewed forum for the publication of original papers and authoritative review and opinion papers dealing with the most important issues facing the use of biomaterials in clinical practice. The scope of the journal covers the wide range of physical, biological and chemical sciences that underpin the design of biomaterials and the clinical disciplines in which they are used. These sciences include polymer synthesis and characterization, drug and gene vector design, the biology of the host response, immunology and toxicology and self assembly at the nanoscale. Clinical applications include the therapies of medical technology and regenerative medicine in all clinical disciplines, and diagnostic systems that reply on innovative contrast and sensing agents. The journal is relevant to areas such as cancer diagnosis and therapy, implantable devices, drug delivery systems, gene vectors, bionanotechnology and tissue engineering.

Website
http://www.journals.elsevier.com/biomaterials/
Impact factor
7.404 (2011)

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Sweet nanoparticles trick kidney

In the past decade nanomedicine has contributed to better detection and treatment of cancer. Nanoparticles are hundreds of times smaller than the smallest grain of sand and can therefore easily travel in the blood stream ...

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Joint replacements are among the most common elective surgeries—but around one in 100 patients suffer post-surgical infections, turning a routine procedure into an expensive and dangerous ordeal. Now, researchers at Stevens ...

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