Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology addresses a range of topics, presenting full-length papers and mini-reviews of new and emerging products, processes and technologies. Coverage includes prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells, relevant enzymes and proteins; applied genetics and molecular biotechnology; genomics and proteomics; applied microbial and cell physiology; environmental biotechnology; process and products and more.

Publisher
Springer
Website
http://www.springer.com/chemistry/biotechnology/journal/253
Impact factor
3.425 (2011)

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Biofilm reactor promises to cut production costs on vitamin K

In an innovative study that promises to reduce production costs for the most potent form of vitamin K—Menaquinone-7, Penn State researchers have developed a novel method to enhance the fermentation process that creates ...

Zika and yellow fever—vaccines without eggs

A team led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems in Magdeburg is developing methods with which viruses for vaccines can be replicated in significantly higher concentrations ...

Genetically engineered yeast soak up heavy metal pollution

Environmental contamination with heavy metals is often the result of various types of industrial processes. Because heavy metals can be dangerous to humans and other wildlife, contaminated sites need to be cleaned up. This ...

Team demonstrates large-scale technique to produce quantum dots

A method to produce significant amounts of semiconducting nanoparticles for light-emitting displays, sensors, solar panels and biomedical applications has gained momentum with a demonstration by researchers at the Department ...

Using tree tannins to target manure odor

Tannins from the quebracho tree can control the production of compounds that cause manure odors, according to studies by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists. This research may someday give livestock farmers options ...

Teaching a microbe to make fuel

(Phys.org) -- A humble soil bacterium called Ralstonia eutropha has a natural tendency, whenever it is stressed, to stop growing and put all its energy into making complex carbon compounds. Now scientists at MIT have taught ...