Animal Behaviour is a double-blind peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 1953 as The British Journal of Animal Behaviour, before obtaining its current title in 1958. It is published monthly by Elsevier for the Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour in collaboration with the Animal Behavior Society. The scope of Animal Behaviour includes behavioural ecology, evolution of behaviour, sociobiology, ethology, behavioural physiology, population biology, and navigation and migration. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 3.101. In addition, it is abstracted and indexed in EMBiology, Scopus, and the Science Citation Index.

Publisher
Elsevier
History
1953–present
Website
http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/622782/description#description
Impact factor
3.101 (2010)

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(Phys.org)—A trio of Brazilian researchers has found that a species of spider, Manogea porracea, is unique in that the male plays a major role in web upkeep and protection of their young. In their paper published in the ...

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Rats exposed to frequent physical, social, and predatory stress during adolescence solved problems and foraged more efficiently under high-threat conditions in adulthood compared with rats that developed without stress, according ...

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Female frogs prefer males who can multitask

From frogs to humans, selecting a mate is complicated. Females of many species judge suitors based on many indicators of health or parenting potential. But it can be difficult for males to produce multiple signals that demonstrate ...

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