The American Journal of Primatology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal and the official journal of the American Society of Primatologists. It was established in 1981. The journal currently publishes 12 issues per year plus a supplementary issue detailing the program of the society's annual meetings. The journal publishes papers in all areas of primatology, including the behavioral ecology, conservation biology, evolutionary biology, life history, demography, paleontology, physiology, endocrinology, genetics, molecular genetics, and psychobiology of nonhuman primates. The journal publishes original research, review articles, book reviews, commentaries, and plenary addresses. The editor-in-chief is Paul Garber (University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign). According to the Journal Citation Reports its 2010 impact factor is 1.980.

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons Wiley-Liss
Country
United States
History
1981—present
Website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1098-2345
Impact factor
1.980 (2010)

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Study sheds light on social drivers of animal dispersal

Why would male and female animals choose different reproductive strategies? For golden lion tamarins in the Brazilian rain forest, the answer may offer clues to help save this neotropical primate.

Bamboo-eating Bale monkeys could still be saved from extinction

There are fewer than 10,000 surviving Bale monkeys in Ethiopia, and they prefer to eat only bamboo – but the bamboo forests are shrinking, and local farmers harass or kill monkeys when they try to eat cultivated foods. ...

Study analyzes the peculiar cranial anatomy of howler monkeys

Emiliano Bruner, of the Paleoneurobiology Group of the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has just published an article in the American Journal of Primatology, which analyzes the peculiar ...

Scientists claim new gibbon species—name it Skywalker

Researchers in China claim they have identified a new species of gibbon in the remote forests along its border with Burma—and have named it after Star Wars character Luke Skywalker.

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