New Age Journal, or New Age: The Journal for Holistic Living was an American periodical prominent in the late 20th century, and defining itself as covering topics related to the period s "New Age"; it has been succeeded, in turn, by Body & Soul, and under new ownership by Body + Soul. It was founded in 1974 by Peggy Taylor and other editors of East/West Journal, and based in the Boston metropolitan area. In 1994 it won an Alternative Press Award for General Excellence from the Utne Reader. It described itself around the late 1990s as concerned with "achievement, commitment, health, creative living, and holistic nutrition". Its publishing of work by Joseph Campbell, Ram Dass, Andrew Weil, Christiane Northrup, Deepak Chopra, and Cheryl Richardson is said to have come before they were respectively widely known. Starting in 1996, the "Body & Soul" title was used by its publisher for weekend conferences, and eventually annual guides. Its editors included: Under new editorship, it was "relaunched" in 2002 as the bi-monthly Body and Soul or Body & Soul. In 2004, it was bought by Martha Stewart s Omnimedia, which as of 2009 publishes Body+Soul (presented on its cover as "whole living

Publisher
Springer Science+Business Media Springer
Country
Netherlands
Website
http://www.springer.com/life+sciences/cell+biology/journal/11357
Impact factor
6.28 (2010)

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(Phys.org) —"The Modern View of Domestication," a special feature of The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) published April 29, raises a number of startling questions about a transition in our deep history ...

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Evil gene would make punishment a tricky business

Are there evil genes or is it only people who can be evil? A recent story in The Age ("Deep Divide of 'Evil Genes'") raised the question of whether criminals might evade responsibility for their crimes by blaming their genes.

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