Advanced Optical Materials is an international, interdisciplinary forum for peer-reviewed papers on materials science which focuses on all aspects of light-matter interactions. Advanced Optical Materials was published as a special focus section integrated in Advanced Materials in 2012 and launched as a journal at the start of 2013. Scope of Advanced Optical Materials Advanced Optical Materials is dedicated to breakthrough discoveries and fundamental research in photonics, plasmonics, metamaterials, and more.

Publisher
Wiley
Website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)2195-1071

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Optical computing at sub-picosecond speeds

Vanderbilt researchers have developed the next generation of ultrafast data transmission that may make it possible to make already high-performance computing "on demand." The technology unjams bottlenecks in data streams ...

Researchers report quantum-limit-approaching chemical sensing chip

University at Buffalo researchers are reporting an advancement of a chemical sensing chip that could lead to handheld devices that detect trace chemicals—everything from illicit drugs to pollution—as quickly as a breathalyzer ...

Light confinement in a 3-D space

The emerging services such as data center cloud interconnection services, ultra-bandwidth video services, and 5G mobile services stimulate the fast development of photonic integrated circuits (PIC), which can meet the increasing ...

Semi-random scattering of light

What is the exact path of light inside a highly scattering material like white paint? This is a question that is impossible to answer, as the particles inside the paint are distributed randomly. This, at the same time, is ...

Scientists capture light in a polymeric quasicrystal

ITMO University scientists have conducted several experiments to investigate polymeric quasicrystals that ultimately confirmed their initial theory. In the future, the use of quasicrystals may open up new possibilities for ...

T-ray camera speed boosted a hundred times over

Scientists are a step closer to developing a fast and cost effective camera that utilises terahertz radiation, potentially opening the opportunity for them to be used in non-invasive security and medical screening.

page 1 from 7