Advanced Functional Materials is a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal, established in February 2001, is published by Wiley-VCH. However, it has been published under other titles since 1985. Coverage of this journal encompasses all topics pertaining to materials science. Topical coverage includes photovoltaics, organic electronics, carbon materials, nanotechnology, liquid crystals, magnetic materials, surfaces and interfaces, and biomaterials. Topics in physics and chemistry. Publishing formats include original research papers, feature articles and highlights. It was established in 2001 by Peter Gregory, the Editor of Advanced Materials, when the Wiley journal Advanced Materials for Optics and Electronics was discontinued. Advanced Functional Materials is the sister journal to Advanced Materials and publishes full papers and feature articles on the development and applications of functional materials, including topics in chemistry, physics, nanotechnology, ceramics, metallurgy, and biomaterials. Frequent topics covered by the journal also include liquid crystals, semiconductors, superconductors, optics, lasers, sensors, porous materials, light-emitting materials, magnetic

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons Wiley-VCH
Country
Germany
History
1985–present
Website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1616-3028
Impact factor
8.486 (2010)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Printing complex cellulose-based objects

Researchers from ETH Zurich and the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa) have set a new world record: they 3-D printed complex objects with higher cellulose content than that of any other ...

This wearable device camouflages its wearer no matter the weather

Researchers at the University of California San Diego developed a wearable technology that can hide its wearer from heat-detecting sensors such as night vision goggles, even when the ambient temperature changes—a feat that ...

Scientists invent lightweight liquid metal materials

Room temperature liquid metal, for example Gallium-based alloy, has high electrical and thermal conductivity, and excellent fluidity. They can be used in various application fields such as flexible electronics, wearable devices, ...

Brain temperature can now be measured using light

Light could replace invasive techniques to measure brain temperature– eliminating the need to place a thermometer in the brain when treating a range of neurological disorders.

Fastest high-precision 3-D printer

3-D printers working in the millimeter range and larger are increasingly used in industrial production processes. Many applications, however, require precise printing on the micrometer scale at a far higher speed. Researchers ...

page 1 from 28