The Acta Biomaterialia is a monthly, peer reviewed, scientific journal published by Elsevier. It is published on behalf of Acta Materialia, Inc., and is sponsored by ASM International and The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS). Volume 1, Issue 1 was published in January 2005. The editor-in-chief is W.R. Wagner of University of Pittsburgh, USA. The focus of this journal is biomaterials science, which includes the interrelationship of biomaterial structure and function from macro scale to nanoscale. Topical coverage includes Biomedical materials, and Biocompatible materials. Formats of publication include original research reports, review papers and rapid communications ("letters").

Publisher
Elsevier
History
2005–present
Website
http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/702994/description#description
Impact factor
5.076 (2011)

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Better tissue healing with disappearing hydrogels

When stem cells are used to regenerate bone tissue, many wind up migrating away from the repair site, which disrupts the healing process. But a technique employed by a University of Rochester research team keeps the stem ...

Mantis shrimp stronger than airplanes

(Phys.org) —Inspired by the fist-like club of a mantis shrimp, a team of researchers led by University of California, Riverside, in collaboration with University of Southern California and Purdue University, have developed ...

Microneedles unlock curcumin's therapeutic potential

While turmeric root has been used medicinally throughout the world for centuries, science has found that its main chemical component, curcumin, breaks down in the body before its ultimate benefits can be achieved. An exciting ...

Microscaffolds: A new strategy in tissue engineering

Until now, there have been two completely different approaches to producing artificial tissue. At TU Wien, a third approach has now been developed that combines the advantages of both.

How to stick sensors to skin without adhesive

Imagine if you could attach something to your skin without needing glue. A biosensor, a watch, a communications device, a fashion accessory—the possibilities are endless. Thanks to a discovery at Binghamton University, ...

Bacterial magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

Magnetic nanoparticles biosynthesized by bacteria might soon play an important role in biomedicine and biotechnology. Researchers of the University of Bayreuth have now developed and optimized a process for the isolation ...

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