Geoscience Currents 59 quantifies students' attitudes toward pursuing geoscience

May 16th, 2012
In continuation of the Geoscience Academic Provenance research series conducted by Houlton (Geoscience Currents 45-48, and 57-58), Geoscience Currents 59 presents quantitative data collected from participants through a Likert-based survey. Participants were asked to rate their feelings toward geoscience on a scale from 1 to 7. The aggregated responses illuminated the changes over time in the students' attitudes toward pursuing geoscience.

A copy of Geoscience Currents 59 can be found online and downloaded from http://www.agiweb.org/workforce/currents.html.

Geoscience Currents are quick snapshots of data released by AGI on the status of the geoscience workforce. The Currents also represent data collaborations with other societies, employers, and professionals. Topics for these reports are inspired by inquiries from geoscience community leaders. Interested in participating in AGI's Geoscience Currents? Visit http://www.agiweb.org/workforce/currents.html, and register to receive free email updates containing all the new Geoscience Currents.

Provided by American Geological Institute

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