Paradigm-shifting publishing format for scientific research

May 14th, 2012
In direct contrast to the increasingly cumbersome and frustrating current model for authoring, editing, reviewing, and publishing scientific literature, Kondziolka et al. have developed an interactive knowledge network, called World Science, that will radically change how scientific knowledge is written, published, and shared. This breakthrough in scientific publishing is featured in an article in the inaugural issue of Disruptive Science and Technology, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. To request a copy of the article "A Knowledge Network for Authoring, Reviewing, Editing, Searching, and Using Scientific or Other Credible Information," please contact journalmarketing1@liebertpub.com.

"We believe this new interactive network sets up, for the first time, what we think is the next century of credible information communication across the world," says Douglas S. Kondziolka, MD, MS, FRCS, Peter J. Jannetta Professor of Neurological Surgery and Radiation Oncology at the University of Pittsburgh & UPMC.

By including multiple elements of knowledge engagement, users, readers, and reviewers can easily examine papers with intuitive and user-friendly tools. On a broader scale, all of the contributors, reviewers, and publishers become part of an integrated knowledge network that focuses on increasing the flow and sharing of scientific information worldwide.

Provided by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

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