Paradigm-shifting publishing format for scientific research

May 14th, 2012
In direct contrast to the increasingly cumbersome and frustrating current model for authoring, editing, reviewing, and publishing scientific literature, Kondziolka et al. have developed an interactive knowledge network, called World Science, that will radically change how scientific knowledge is written, published, and shared. This breakthrough in scientific publishing is featured in an article in the inaugural issue of Disruptive Science and Technology, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. To request a copy of the article "A Knowledge Network for Authoring, Reviewing, Editing, Searching, and Using Scientific or Other Credible Information," please contact journalmarketing1@liebertpub.com.

"We believe this new interactive network sets up, for the first time, what we think is the next century of credible information communication across the world," says Douglas S. Kondziolka, MD, MS, FRCS, Peter J. Jannetta Professor of Neurological Surgery and Radiation Oncology at the University of Pittsburgh & UPMC.

By including multiple elements of knowledge engagement, users, readers, and reviewers can easily examine papers with intuitive and user-friendly tools. On a broader scale, all of the contributors, reviewers, and publishers become part of an integrated knowledge network that focuses on increasing the flow and sharing of scientific information worldwide.

Provided by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

Minimally invasive surgery with hydraulic assistance

Endoscopic surgery requires great manual dexterity on the part of the operating surgeon. Future endoscopic instruments equipped with a hydraulic control system will provide added support during minimally ...

New absorber will lead to better biosensors

Biological sensors, or biosensors, are like technological canaries in the coalmine. By converting a biological response into an optical or electrical signal, they can alert us to dangers in our external and internal environments. ...

What happens in our brain when we unlock a door?

People who are unable to button up their jacket or who find it difficult to insert a key in lock suffer from a condition known as apraxia. This means that their motor skills have been impaired – as a result ...

Lift weights, improve your memory

Here's another reason why it's a good idea to hit the gym: it can improve memory. A new Georgia Institute of Technology study shows that an intense workout of as little as 20 minutes can enhance episodic ...