DOE Plasma Science Center Annual Meeting at Princeton Plasma Lab

May 11th, 2012
More than 50 plasma physicists from across the country will assemble at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) on Thursday, May 17, and Friday, May 18, for the third annual meeting of the Plasma Science Center for Predictive Control of Plasma Kinetics. The Laboratory is located on the Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro, N.J.

The DOE-funded center was launched with a five-year grant in 2009 to bring together physicists involved in fundamental research on low-temperature plasmas with vast potential for practical applications, explained PPPL physicist Igor Kaganovich, who organized this year's meeting. Such applications range from lighting and renewable energy to medicine and microelectronics. Scheduled meeting events include presentations by co-principal investigators and invited speakers, and a display of posters. A poster session is scheduled for Thursday, May 17, from 1:40 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. in the lobby of PPPL's main Lyman Spitzer Building.

Provided by DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

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