Loyola Med student wins prize for excellence in neurology

May 11th, 2012
Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine student Jason Cuomo has received a 2012 American Academy of Neurology Medical Student Prize for Excellence in Neurology.

The award recognizes excellence in clinical neurology among medical students. The Stritch faculty selected Cuomo to receive the prize, which is awarded annually on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology. The award is given to a student who exemplifies outstanding scientific achievement and clinical acumen in neurology or neuroscience, and outstanding integrity, compassion and leadership.

"Jason is mature, inquisitive, eager to learn, motivated and highly responsible," said Dr. Jose Biller, chairman of the Department of Neurology. "He is a very accomplished and talented medical student."

Cuomo is completing his second year of medical school. He is active in Stritch's Honors in Research Program and is vice president of the Student Interest Group in Neurology. He is a co-author of nine academic articles, book chapters, abstracts and presentations.

Cuomo grew up in Guilford, Ct. He graduated from Boston College with double majors in psychology and philosophy, and has a master's degree in philosophy from Boston College.

Provided by Loyola University Health System

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