The future of aerospace takes off in Montreal

May 10th, 2012
The Canadian aerospace industry is the third largest in the world behind the USA and the European Community. In order to retain or improve its position in this competitive marketplace, Canada – and Concordia University – must keep abreast of the latest technologies.

For Concordia professor Suong Van Hoa, that means accelerating the scientific and technical know-how relating to a new composite materials manufacturing technique known as Automated Fibre Placement (AFP). Now, thanks to the support from the federal government and industry, Concordia will remain at the leading edge of aerospace teaching and research.

This morning, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) – alongside industrial partners, Bombardier Aerospace, Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Ltd., Composites Atlantic, Delastek and Emergia Aerospace – announced $3.4 million in funding over five years for Hoa's research.

This invaluable financial support will allow Concordia to build on its existing strength in aerospace research while uniting the university with industry leaders who have signed on to co-fund the professor's project.

"Canadian researchers have a strong track record in aerospace research and development that has made our country one of the top competitors globally," says NSERC President Suzanne Fortier. "Dr. Hoa and his team have identified key areas where the Canadian aerospace industry will benefit from innovation. His industrial partners will benefit greatly from this leading-edge research, and Canada's aerospace sector will break new ground in a highly competitive sector."

Provided by Concordia University

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