The Journal of Urology wins 2012 ASAE Gold Circle Award

May 10th, 2012
The Journal of Urology, the official journal of the American Urological Association (AUA), has won the 2012 ASAE Gold Circle Award (Peer-Reviewed Journal category).

Michael Sheppard, CPA, CAE, Executive Director, AUA comments, "Earlier this year, the AUA nominated The Journal of Urology® for an ASAE Gold Circle Award (Peer-Reviewed Journal category). The Gold Circle Awards are presented annually by the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE)— the largest, and the only international organization serving the association community, representing more than 21,000 association executives and industry partners across 10,000 organizations. The Gold Circle Awards honor extraordinary communication efforts across nine categories. The Peer-Reviewed Journal category judged nominees on clarity, completeness of author guidelines, writing style/quality and peer-review process."

"We commend the AUA and The Journal's Editors, Editorial Board, and Publications Team led by Mrs. Deborah Polly on this well-deserved award," comments Glen P. Campbell, Executive Vice President, STM (Scientific, Technical, and Medical) Journals at Elsevier, Publisher of The Journal of Urology®. "It recognizes The Journal for accomplishing two critical goals: publishing outstanding research in the specialty of urology while at the same time meeting the clinical and information needs of all AUA members."

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