Writing a landmark sequel to 'The Book of Life'

May 2nd, 2012
Scientists are announcing the roadmap, policies and procedures for an ambitious international project that aims to compile a landmark sequel to "The Book of Life." The follow-up to the Human Genome Project, which decoded all of the genes that make up humans, involves identifying and profiling all of the proteins produced by the thousands of genes bundled together in all of the human chromosomes. Called the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP), it is the topic of an article in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research.

William Hancock, Young-Ki Paik and colleagues explain that C-HPP's goal is the next logical step after the 2001 deciphering of the human genome — a step critical for applying that genetic knowledge in medicine. Genes contain instructions for making proteins, the biological workhorses that influence every aspect of health and disease. Hancock, Paik and colleagues formed C-HPP, an international group of 20 scientific teams, to coordinate efforts to decode this full complement of human, chromosome-encoded proteins, termed the "proteome."

C-HPP's first target will be thousands of "missing" proteins — proteins that should exist, based on the instructions in genes and other genetic evidence, but remain undiscovered. C-HPP will also help determine what these proteins do in health and disease. The article notes that the Journal of Proteome Research and its publisher, the American Chemical Society, will support C-HPP by publishing results of this work and stimulating recruitment of additional research teams.

Provided by American Chemical Society

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

Earliest evidence of reproduction in a complex organism

Researchers led by the University of Cambridge have found the earliest example of reproduction in a complex organism. Their new study has found that some organisms known as rangeomorphs, which lived 565 million years ago, ...

Caterpillar chemical turns ants into bodyguards

A trio of researchers with Kobe University in Japan has found that lycaenid butterfly caterpillars of the Japanese oakblue variety, have dorsal nectary organ secretions that cause ants that eat the material to abandon their ...

Researchers investigate increased ocean acidification

The primary cause of global ocean acidification is the oceanic absorption of CO2 from the atmosphere. Although this absorption helps to mitigate some of the effects of anthropogenic climate change, it has resulted in a reduction ...

New lizard named after Sir David Attenborough

A research team led by Dr Martin Whiting from the Department of Biological Sciences recently discovered a beautifully coloured new species of flat lizard, which they have named Platysaurus attenboroughi, after Sir David Attenborough.

'Snowball earth' might be slushy

Imagine a world without liquid water—just solid ice in all directions. It would certainly not be a place that most life forms would like to live.