Writing a landmark sequel to 'The Book of Life'

May 2nd, 2012
Scientists are announcing the roadmap, policies and procedures for an ambitious international project that aims to compile a landmark sequel to "The Book of Life." The follow-up to the Human Genome Project, which decoded all of the genes that make up humans, involves identifying and profiling all of the proteins produced by the thousands of genes bundled together in all of the human chromosomes. Called the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP), it is the topic of an article in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research.

William Hancock, Young-Ki Paik and colleagues explain that C-HPP's goal is the next logical step after the 2001 deciphering of the human genome — a step critical for applying that genetic knowledge in medicine. Genes contain instructions for making proteins, the biological workhorses that influence every aspect of health and disease. Hancock, Paik and colleagues formed C-HPP, an international group of 20 scientific teams, to coordinate efforts to decode this full complement of human, chromosome-encoded proteins, termed the "proteome."

C-HPP's first target will be thousands of "missing" proteins — proteins that should exist, based on the instructions in genes and other genetic evidence, but remain undiscovered. C-HPP will also help determine what these proteins do in health and disease. The article notes that the Journal of Proteome Research and its publisher, the American Chemical Society, will support C-HPP by publishing results of this work and stimulating recruitment of additional research teams.

Provided by American Chemical Society

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

Sexual fantasies: Are you normal?

Hoping for sex with two women is common but fantasizing about golden showers is not. That's just one of the findings from a research project that scientifically defines sexual deviation for the first time ever. It was undertaken ...

New study finds oceans arrived early to Earth

Earth is known as the Blue Planet because of its oceans, which cover more than 70 percent of the planet's surface and are home to the world's greatest diversity of life. While water is essential for life ...

Science casts light on sex in the orchard

Persimmons are among the small club of plants with separate sexes—individual trees are either male or female. Now scientists at the University of California, Davis, and Kyoto University in Japan have discovered ...

Cassini sees sunny seas on Titan

(Phys.org) —As it soared past Saturn's large moon Titan recently, NASA's Cassini spacecraft caught a glimpse of bright sunlight reflecting off hydrocarbon seas.

Future air passengers may get unique, windowless view

A windowless airplane sounds like a claustrophobic nightmare. A windowless airplane with OLED displays, aura-enhanced with subtle cabin lighting from gently glowing walls could be quite something else. Using ...