NYU Langone experts present research, clinical advances at neurosurgeons meeting

April 13th, 2012
Neurosurgeons from NYU Langone Medical Center will present research and discuss surgical approaches and use of new technologies to treat neurosurgical conditions at the annual meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS), held April 14-18, 2012 in Miami Beach, FL. NYU Langone faculty will present the latest techniques and participate in lectures at AANS, including:

*Craino-Cervical and C1C2 Stabilization Techniques, Surgical Approaches*

Saturday, April 14 at 8:00A

Noel I. Perin, MD, member of the faculty and director of minimally invasive spinal neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery

This clinic will evaluate craniocervical anatomy and pathology, review various treatments of disorders of the brain and discuss the construction of physiological modes of therapy.

*Current Surgical Techniques and Approaches to Minimally Invasive Surgery*

Sunday, April 15 at 8:00A

Anthony K. Frempong-Boadu, MD, associate professor and director of spinal surgery, Department of Neurosurgery This course will discuss the nuances, as well as the pros and cons, of various approaches and techniques in spinal surgical procedures.

*Low-Grade Gliomas*

Monday, April 16 at 7:30A

Jeffrey H. Wisoff, MD, associate professor and director of pediatric neurosurgery, Departments of Neurosurgery and Pediatrics This seminar will discuss current evaluation and management of low-grade gliomas and address the variety of tumors and compare outcomes of various treatment strategies.

*Open vs. Endoscopic Approaches to the Anterior Skull Base*

Tuesday, April 17 at 7:30A

Moderator: Chandranath Sen, MD, faculty member and director of the benign brain tumor and cranial nerve disease program, Department of Neurosurgery

This seminar will address methods for avoiding or managing complications that may occur when treating anterior cranial base conditions as well as demonstrate specialized surgical approaches and the appropriate application of emerging technology.

*Surgical Approaches to the Lateral Skull Base*

Tuesday, April 17 at 7:30A

John G. Golfinos, MD, associate professor, Departments of Neurosurgery and Otolaryngology and chair, Department of Neurosurgery This seminar will provide approaches to lesions across the lateral skull base with emphasis on preservation of normal function and avoidance of common pitfalls.

*Preoperative Embolization for Complex Meningiomas*

Tuesday, April 17 at 2:03P

Howard A. Riina, MD, faculty member and vice chair of clinical affairs, Department of Neurosurgery

This presentation will highlight the benefits of embolization as an approach to managing challenging meningiomas, such as those larger-sized lesions or those of the skull base.

*Neuromodulation for Cluster Headaches*

Tuesday, April 17 at 2:20P

Alon Y. Mogilner, MD, PhD, faculty member, Department of Neurosurgery

This presentation will look at the effectiveness of implanting tiny neurostimulators as a way to regulate occipital nerves and circumvent pain in those suffering chronic headaches.

*Cerebral Venous System: Surgical Considerations*

Wednesday, April 18 at 7:30A

Chandranath Sen, MD, faculty member and director of the benign brain tumor and cranial nerve disease program, Department of Neurosurgery

This seminar will review the anatomy and surgery of the major venous sinuses and veins of the brain, the venous hazards of intracranial surgery and the approaches to the cavernous sinus and jugular foramen.

Provided by NYU Langone Medical Center

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