HUNT Biosciences and SomaLogic collaborate to validate protein biomarkers of cardiovascular risk

April 10th, 2012
HUNT Biosciences and SomaLogic, Inc., today announced a new collaboration to advance the clinical use of protein biomarkers, with an initial focus on the validation of biomarkers for the prediction of cardiovascular events such as strokes, heart attacks, and heart failure.

The collaboration will analyze biological samples and clinical data from HUNT Biosciences using SomaLogic's unique SOMAscan™ proteomic technology. HUNT Biosciences will work with SomaLogic to select and supply samples and accompanying clinical data and selected phenotype information from up to 2000 of the more than 100 000 participants in the large HUNT health study.

"We believe the HUNT health study offers samples and data that will help identify and validate protein biomarkers of high clinical significance," said Dr. Per A. Foss, CEO of HUNT Biosciences. "SomaLogic has a promising technology and the company shares our vision of the importance of biomarkers to improve healthcare. We believe this collaboration has a significant potential and could be extended to include other medical conditions that will benefit from the discovery and use of well-documented biomarkers".

"We are delighted to work with HUNT biosciences to develop new diagnostic tools that predict cardiovascular risk," said Stephen Williams, Chief Medical Officer of SomaLogic. "The clinical sample cohort available through the HUNT health study is among the broadest in the world, and we believe that our technology is uniquely capable of deriving new clinical insights from those samples that can lead to new diagnostics and acceleration of drug discovery and development efforts to the benefit of patients everywhere."

Provided by SomaLogic, Inc.

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