Feinstein Institute scientists present data about glioblastoma at AACR Annual Meeting

April 4th, 2012
Scientists from the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research will present three abstracts about Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and deadly adult brain cancer, at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting to be held from Saturday through Wednesday (March 31- April 4) in Chicago, IL.

GBM is an incurable disease and patients who are diagnosed with GBM have approximately one year to live. Treatment for GBM can involve chemotherapy, radiation, radiosurgery, among a few other methods, but it's important to note that glioblastoma tumors spread very quickly and are highly resistant standard treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This resistance often leads to tumor recurrence even after treatment.

A team of researchers at the Feinstein are presenting the following abstracts on this topic:

  • Abstract Number LB-503: "Pharmacological inhibition of microglia leads to increased survival in a murine model of glioblastoma multiforme in conjunction with ionizing radiation"
  • Ian S. Miller, PhD, Post-Doctoral research fellow at the Center for Oncology and Cell Biology at the Feinstein Institute, will present this data.
  • Abstract Number LB-515: "Guanine nucleotide exchange factor Dock7 expression is increased in human glioblastoma and mediates tumor cell invasion"
  • David W. Murray, senior research assistant at the Feinstein Institute, will present this data.
  • Abstract Number LB-516: "PDZ-RhoGEF promotes glioblastoma cell invasion, proliferation and survival"
  • Aneta Kwiatkowska, PhD, Post-Doctoral research fellow at the Feinstein Institute, will present this data.
All three of these abstracts will be present on Wednesday, April 04, from 8:00 am - 12:00 pm CT.

Provided by North Shore-Long Island Jewish (LIJ) Health System

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