Feinstein Institute scientists present data about glioblastoma at AACR Annual Meeting

April 4th, 2012
Scientists from the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research will present three abstracts about Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and deadly adult brain cancer, at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting to be held from Saturday through Wednesday (March 31- April 4) in Chicago, IL.

GBM is an incurable disease and patients who are diagnosed with GBM have approximately one year to live. Treatment for GBM can involve chemotherapy, radiation, radiosurgery, among a few other methods, but it's important to note that glioblastoma tumors spread very quickly and are highly resistant standard treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This resistance often leads to tumor recurrence even after treatment.

A team of researchers at the Feinstein are presenting the following abstracts on this topic:

  • Abstract Number LB-503: "Pharmacological inhibition of microglia leads to increased survival in a murine model of glioblastoma multiforme in conjunction with ionizing radiation"
  • Ian S. Miller, PhD, Post-Doctoral research fellow at the Center for Oncology and Cell Biology at the Feinstein Institute, will present this data.
  • Abstract Number LB-515: "Guanine nucleotide exchange factor Dock7 expression is increased in human glioblastoma and mediates tumor cell invasion"
  • David W. Murray, senior research assistant at the Feinstein Institute, will present this data.
  • Abstract Number LB-516: "PDZ-RhoGEF promotes glioblastoma cell invasion, proliferation and survival"
  • Aneta Kwiatkowska, PhD, Post-Doctoral research fellow at the Feinstein Institute, will present this data.
All three of these abstracts will be present on Wednesday, April 04, from 8:00 am - 12:00 pm CT.

Provided by North Shore-Long Island Jewish (LIJ) Health System

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

For faster battery charging, try a quantum battery?

(Phys.org)—Physicists have shown that a quantum battery—basically, a quantum system such as a qubit that stores energy in its quantum states—can theoretically be charged at a faster rate than conventional batteries. ...

Sundew discovery on Facebook makes plant science news

A new species of sundew has been discovered on Facebook. The find is a carnivorous sundew, Drosera magnifica. The new discovery comes from a single mountaintop in southeastern Brazil—the largest New World sundew.

Caterpillar chemical turns ants into bodyguards

A trio of researchers with Kobe University in Japan has found that lycaenid butterfly caterpillars of the Japanese oakblue variety, have dorsal nectary organ secretions that cause ants that eat the material to abandon their ...

Researchers investigate increased ocean acidification

The primary cause of global ocean acidification is the oceanic absorption of CO2 from the atmosphere. Although this absorption helps to mitigate some of the effects of anthropogenic climate change, it has resulted in a reduction ...

Magnetism at nanoscale

As the demand grows for ever smaller, smarter electronics, so does the demand for understanding materials' behavior at ever smaller scales. Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are building a unique ...