Elsevier launches new journal: Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders

March 27th, 2012
Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and solutions, is pleased to announce the launch of a new quarterly journal, Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders. The first issue of the journal is now available online.

Obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) have intrigued those in the medical and mental health fields for as long as the disorders were first identified by Freud over a century ago. Although crucial advances in understanding and treating OCD have been made over the past half century, important questions remain unanswered regarding the causes of OCD, its true nature, and its boundaries with other seemingly similar mental disorders. Examples are that OCD in elderly and the very young are not well understood, nor do we know how they are influenced by ethnic and cultural factors or how these disorders can be prevented? How can we improve on existing treatments? These and other issues are addressed in the Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders.

Prof. Jonathan S. Abramowitz of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Editor-in-Chief of the journal said of the launch, "As the founding Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, my vision for the journal is to create an international and interdisciplinary forum to foster communication and collaboration across the various clinical and academic fields concerned with Obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD)."

The Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders publishes high quality research and clinically-oriented articles dealing with all aspects of obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) and related conditions (obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders: e.g. trichotillomania, hoarding, body dysmorphic disorder).

Provided by Elsevier

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