Regenstrief Institute investigator recognized as a Top New Geriatrics Investigator

March 26th, 2012
Regenstrief Institute investigator Noll Campbell, PharmD is an Indiana University Center for Aging Research center scientist, a research assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University College of Pharmacy, and clinical pharmacy specialist in geriatrics with Wishard Health Services. Credit: Regenstrief Institute, Inc.
Regenstrief Institute investigator Noll Campbell, PharmD, has been chosen by the American Geriatrics Society to receive a Merck/American Geriatrics Society 2012 New Investigator Award. He is the first doctor of pharmacy to receive this award, which is designed to recognize individuals who are committed to a career in aging research.

This recognition is presented to individuals whose original research reflects new and relevant work in geriatrics. The award will be presented at the AGS annual scientific meeting in Seattle in May.

"Noll Campbell is a rising young pharmacoepidemiologist dedicated to improving the lives of older adults. His clinical research into the negative effects of many medications on the aging brain has impressed and influenced other investigators both in the country and abroad," said Regenstrief Institute investigator Malaz Boustani, M.D., MPH, associate professor of medicine at the Indiana University School of Medicine and associate director of the IU Center for Aging Research. Dr. Boustani is also the medical director of the Healthy Aging Brain Center at Wishard Health Services.

In addition to his Regenstrief appointment, Dr. Campbell is a research assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University College of Pharmacy, and clinical pharmacy specialist in geriatrics with Wishard Health Services. Wishard is one of the largest public hospital systems in the United States.

"Few graduates of pharmacy schools progress to the clinical proficiency that Dr. Campbell possesses, and even fewer develop that interest to pursue clinical research. His early success in the research environment strongly suggests that his work will fill important gaps in the clinical literature and improve the care of a frail population," said Regenstrief Institute investigator Michael Murray, PharmD, MPH, Distinguished Professor and Endowed Chair of Medication Safety, Purdue University College of Pharmacy. Dr. Murray is also the executive director of the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Improvement and Research.

Provided by Indiana University School of Medicine

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

Synchrotron upgrade to make X-rays even brighter

(Phys.org) —The X-rays produced by the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) are bright, but they will soon be even brighter, thanks to a major upgrade that will make the quality of CHESS' X-rays ...

How the lotus got its own administration

Actually the lotus is a very ordinary plant. Nevertheless, during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) a complex bureaucratic structure was built up around this plant. The lotus was part of the Imperial Household, ...

What labels on textiles can tell us about society

Throughout Chinese history, dynastic states used labels on textiles to spread information on the maker, the commissioner, the owner or the date and site of production. Silks produced in state-owned manufacture ...

How large-scale technology projects affect knowledge

What do an accelerator complex at Cern, a manufacturing center in 19th century Philadelphia and lotus cultivation during the Qing dynasty all have in common? All such activities generate knowledge and know-how. ...