Joshua A. Copel, MD, to be presented with the William J. Fry Memorial Lecture Award

March 26th, 2012
Joshua A. Copel, MD, will be honored with the William J. Fry Memorial Lecture Award during the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) Annual Convention at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort and Spa in Phoenix, Arizona, on March 30, 2012. The William J. Fry Memorial Lecture Award recognizes a current or retired AIUM member who has significantly contributed in his or her particular field to the scientific progress of medical ultrasound.

Dr Copel is well known worldwide as an expert in maternal and fetal medicine and in high-risk pregnancy. He has served on several editorial boards, including the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, the Journal of Maternal and Fetal Investigation, Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, the Journal of Diagnostic Medical Sonography, and Contemporary OB/GYN. His passion for working in medical ultrasound derives from his excitement for the possibilities in obstetrics. His time is generously spent on advancing the ultrasound profession, for which he has received numerous awards, ranging from the Nathan Kase Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching at Yale to the Dru Carlson Memorial Award for Best Research in Ultrasound and Genetics from the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine.

Dr Copel has written more than 180 peer-reviewed articles. In addition, he is the author of multiple books and hundreds of abstracts, as well as being a prolific and well-respected lecturer. He is currently professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences, professor of pediatrics, and vice chair of obstetrics at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut. He has been president of the New England Perinatal Society and the AIUM. His innovative research efforts have helped advance the field of diagnostic ultrasound, making him a commendable recipient of this award.

Provided by American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine

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