Carnegie's Richard Meserve receives inaugural Garwin Award

February 9th, 2012
The Federation of American Scientists presented Richard A. Meserve, the Carnegie Institution president, with the inaugural 2011 Richard L. Garwin Award on February 8, for "his distinguished service and significant contributions to nuclear safety as chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and for more than 30 years of leadership in science policy." The award "reaffirms his work at the intersection of law, science, and technology."

The federation is a non-partisan think tank that provides objective analysis and practical policy recommendations on international, applied science and technology security issues. It is dedicated to educating policymakers, the public, media, and others about the need for creating a more secure world.

Richard Garwin is a physicist who has advised the federal government on national security issues beginning with the Eisenhower administration in the 1950s. He is one of the most influential science and science policy experts in the U.S. and has been a tireless advocate for arms control. In 2003, he received the National Medal of Science.

"I have long admired Dick Garwin since my first interactions with him from over 30 years ago. I am extraordinarily proud that I have been selected to receive this inaugural award," said President Meserve.

Meserve is the ninth president of the Carnegie Institution. He stepped down as chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to join Carnegie as president in 2003. He is a member of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future established by the Secretary of Energy at the direction of the President. He currently serves as chairman of the International Nuclear Safety Group, which is chartered by the International Atomic Energy Agency. He has led numerous studies undertaken by the National Academies over the years.

Provided by Carnegie Institution

This Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

Horn of Africa drying ever faster as climate warms

The Horn of Africa has become increasingly arid in sync with the global and regional warming of the last century and at a rate unprecedented in the last 2,000 years, according to new research led by a University of Arizona ...

What are white holes?

Black holes are created when stars die catastrophically in a supernova. So what in the universe is a white hole?

Could 'The Day After Tomorrow' happen?

A researcher from the University of Southampton has produced a scientific study of the climate scenario featured in the disaster movie 'The Day After Tomorrow'.

A mission to a metal world—The Psyche mission

In their drive to set exploration goals for the future, NASA's Discovery Program put out the call for proposals for their thirteenth Discovery mission in February 2014. After reviewing the 27 initial proposals, a panel of ...

The universe's most miraculous molecule

It's the second most abundant substance in the universe. It dissolves more materials than any other solvent. It stores incredible amounts of energy. Life as we know it would not be possible without it. And although it covers ...

Scientists paint quantum electronics with beams of light

A team of scientists from the University of Chicago and the Pennsylvania State University have accidentally discovered a new way of using light to draw and erase quantum-mechanical circuits in a unique class of materials ...