New book examines impact of 'oversharing' in a digitally connected world

January 9th, 2012
Millions of people text, tweet, pin or post to Facebook and other popular websites. They view social media as an integral part of their daily lives.

There is a downside to all the connectedness though, argues Ben Agger, a sociology professor at The University of Texas at Arlington: people divulge more of their inner feelings, opinions and sexuality than they would in person, or even over the phone. 

Agger, director of the UT Arlington Center for Theory, examines the impact of “oversharing” in his new book, “Oversharing: Presentations of Self in the Internet Age,” due out Feb. 20 from Routledge USA.

“My book offers insights about how we can attempt to re-draw the boundaries between personal and public life so that some things are kept private and personal.”

It is okay to turn off the electronic connections from time to time, Agger said.

“If we are always oversharing, we tend to lose some of ourselves, our basic identities,” he said. “Oversharing becomes a source of stress in its own right.”

Agger is one of the many prolific writers and researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington, a comprehensive research institution of 33,439 students in the heart of North Texas. Visit www.uta.edu to learn more.

Provided by University of Texas at Arlington

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