ORNL's alumina-forming austenitic alloy licensed to Carpenter Technology Corp.

April 7th, 2011
Metal alloy manufacturer Carpenter Technology Corp. has licensed an alumina-forming austenitic stainless steel alloy developed at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

The new alloy, developed at ORNL by Phil Maziasz, Bruce Pint, Michael Brady, Zhaoping Lu, Chain T. Liu and Yukinori Yamamoto, is unique in that the composition allows for alumina scales to form on the exterior of the steel, providing significant oxidation resistance.

The alloy displays excellent creep strength at high temperatures (700-800 Celsius). While some of these characteristics may be found in existing alloys, this new alloy can be produced at a lower price than other existing alloys, which require high amounts of nickel.

"Any application in which high temperatures or corrosive environments are encountered could be a potential application of this technology," said Tim Armstrong, Carpenter Technology vice president for research and development.

Potential applications include recuperators and heat exchangers, down-hole drilling and chemical processing equipment and materials.

The agreement with Carpenter allows for the sale of the alloy in a variety of bulk forms that have been vacuum melted.

Provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Tech giants look to skies to spread Internet

The shortest path to the Internet for some remote corners of the world may be through the skies. That is the message from US tech giants seeking to spread the online gospel to hard-to-reach regions.

Wireless industry makes anti-theft commitment

A trade group for wireless providers said Tuesday that the biggest mobile device manufacturers and carriers will soon put anti-theft tools on the gadgets to try to deter rampant smartphone theft.

Astronomers: 'Tilt-a-worlds' could harbor life

A fluctuating tilt in a planet's orbit does not preclude the possibility of life, according to new research by astronomers at the University of Washington, Utah's Weber State University and NASA. In fact, ...