Hepatitis C: is immunity on the horizon?

November 17th, 2010
(PhysOrg.com) -- More than 250,000 Canadians are infected with the highly infectious, chronic liver disease Hepatitis C, which is caused by the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). The virus continues to spread in a variety of ways such as needle sharing, unsanitary tattooing, pedicures and manicures, and unprotected sex.

Unlike Hepatitis A and B, there is no vaccine for this unique strain and existing treatments are not always effective. Progress is, however, being made and new information will be shared on Nov. 19 at the Fifth Annual Immunology Montreal Symposium hosted by McGill University. The gathering of international experts will focus on recent advances made in the field of immunology regarding HCV infection.

WHAT: Fifth Annual Immunology Montreal Symposium

“Immunity to Hepatitis C Virus: Recent Advances”

WHEN: Nov. 19, 8:30 a.m.- 3 p.m.

WHERE: McGill University, New Residence Hall, 3625 Parc Ave.

Scheduled speakers include Stanley M. Lemon, a world-renowned expert on HCV replication and innate antiviral responses, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Matthias Götte, an associate professor of biochemical virology at McGill and a recognized expert in HCV drug resistance; Daniel Lamarre, a professor at the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer at Université de Montréal, and a specialist of innate responses against HCV; Naglaa Shoukry, Director of the viral hepatitis research group of the CHUM Research Centre of Université de Montréal, and a specialist on T-cell responses against HCV in the acute phase of the infection; Arash Grakoui of the Emory Vaccine Center in Atlanta, Georgia; and Paul Klenerman, professor of immunology at the University of Oxford in the U.K., and one of the world’s leading HCV immunologists.

Immunology Montreal is a collaborative venture between McGill University, Université de Montréal and INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier. Its primary objective is to help educate students at all levels (with the focus on high school through university), as well as the general population, about immunology while forging ties between the educational institutions in the greater Montreal area.

Following presentations there will be an opportunity for students, trainees, researchers or the media to meet the speakers for additional information.

Provided by McGill University

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