Official statement by ACS: Release of National Climate Assessment demands action

May 7th, 2014
Yesterday's release of the third National Climate Assessment (NCA) should serve as a claxon call for policymakers and the general public to take action to address and mitigate the observable and documented adverse climate disruption impacts being observed in every region and key economic sector of the United States.

These impacts, which have been observed and measured, are wreaking havoc with our society. This is a not a theoretical assessment; this report cites changes we are all observing and with which we are living. The future climate trends outlined in the report are even more dire. We should all be deeply concerned.

Of the report's five major findings, the fifth describes the disturbing probable outcome of climate disruption currently being observed:

"Climate change threatens human health and well-being in many ways, including through more extreme weather events and wildfire, decreased air quality, and diseases transmitted by insects, food and water."

ACS has long held the position that climate change is real and serious and that our nation needs strong policies and actions to protect against further adverse impacts, and we need to address the impacts we are already observing.

For 14 years, ACS has held a climate change policy position, which has been strengthened and updated routinely as new scientific analyses became available. The current public policy statement can be found by clicking on this link.

To assist its members, policymakers and the general public understand the science behind our climate, the ACS created an online Climate Science Toolkit of scientific information and resources.

Provided by American Chemical Society

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